Sandel Avionics Inc. News

Maintainability vs. Availability of Parts

Posted Friday, August 08, 2014 Posted in Company News, Industry News

Cockpit Considerations--Making the Case for Avionics Upgrades

Produced by Aviation Week, written by Paul Seidenman

Today, the decision to bring a cockpit into the 21st century is more than just a matter of considering front-end acquisition and installation costs for the new equipment. Also factored into the mix is maintainability, which is becoming increasingly dependent on the availability of parts.

THE COST OF REPLACING OLDER EQUIPMENT IS ESCALATING

Posted Friday, August 08, 2014 Posted in Company News, Industry News

Cockpit Considerations--Making the Case for Avionics Upgrades

Produced by Aviation Week, written by Paul Seidenman for Sandel Avionics

“The question is, do you want to keep repairing at anywhere between $17,000 to $35,000 per unit for replacement CRTs—which add no value to the aircraft—or do you want an upgrade to a new technology system, where you’re not going to have reliability and repair cost issues.” - Mark Wilken, director of
avionics sales for Elliott Aviation

As a result of dwindling supplies, the cost of replacement screens is escalating, and as Wilken notes, an older EFIS suite can account for between three and seven CRTs on the instrument panel.

MODERN AVIONICS WEIGH LESS, USE SPACE BETTER AND ARE ENERGY EFFICIENT

Posted Friday, August 08, 2014 Posted in Industry News

Cockpit Considerations--Making the Case for Avionics Upgrades

“Because they are smaller, less space is consumed on the instrument panel. In the past, for instance, a CRT-based EFIS would require a separate display image generator along with the display unit. Now, both can be incorporated within a single unit.” - Blake Hogge, senior manager of avionics sales at Jet Aviation

Along with greater reliability and product availability, modern avionics also offer a weight savings dividend, which could be as much as 250 pounds, according to Blake Hogge, senior manager of avionics sales at Jet Aviation’s maintenance facility in Cahokia, IL.

Rotorcraft & TAWS

Posted Thursday, August 07, 2014 Posted in Industry News

FAA on HTAWS

Enhancing Pilot Situation Awareness for Increased Safety

Avionics Intelligence Executive Briefing, Courtney E. Howard. Avionics Intelligence :: EXECUTIVE BRIEFING :: sponsored by Sandel. January 2014

The FAA is credited with having coined the term “terrain awareness and warning system (TAWS)” to encompass a variety of current and future systems that meet the requirements of FAA Proposed Technical Standard Order TSO-C151, Terrain Awareness and Warning System, and TSO-C194, Helicopter Terrain Awareness and Warning System. (Installation of HTAWS is defined in AC 27-1B, Certification of Normal Category Rotorcraft, and AC 29-2C, Certification of Transport Category Rotorcraft.)

Sandel, Garmin and Honeywell develop new HTAWS to warn pilots about wires, cables and power lines

Posted Tuesday, June 17, 2014 Posted in Q&A, Industry News

Significant progress has been made by these avionics producers with advanced databases, displays and alerting systems.

Sandel, Garmin and Honeywell develop new HTAWS to warn pilots about wires, cables and power lines

FAA’s recent rule making announcements mandated some new equipment and higher levels of training aimed at stemming the increased accident and fatality rates. Today there are more uses and increased value in helicopter operations, which influence almost every aspect of society. And the dangers associated with operations down low for helicopters has led to a need to do something different. FAA notes that “These pilots fly year-round in rural and urban settings, over mountainous and nonmountainous terrain, during the day and during the night, and in conditions where visibility is good and in conditions here it is not. They must often land at unfamiliar, remote, or unimproved sites with hazards like trees, buildings, towers, wires, and uneven terrain.”